Monthly Archives: February 2017

The Rydal Mount Wordsworth prize for young poets: entries now open

Dear Head Teacher

The descendants of William Wordsworth invite entries from your pupils for the annual Rydal Mount Wordsworth prize for young poets.

All students at Cumbrian schools are eligible to take part. The theme this year is “A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE”, which can be interpreted as the writer wishes. The winning poem will be framed and displayed alongside the work of the great poet in his former home, for thousands of visitors to see.

Entries should be typed in 12 or 14 point font, double spaced, and no longer than one side of A4 paper. They should be saved as individual Word documents and emailed as attachments to rydalpoetry@gmail.com

Entries should include the name and age of the entrant, and the contact details of the student’s school. The closing date for entries is Monday March 20.

THE EMAILS WILL BE OPENED DIRECTLY BY THE WORDSWORTH FAMILY.  PLEASE ASK CLASS TEACHERS TO SEND ENTRIES FROM HIS OR HER PUPILS FROM ONE IDENTIFIABLE EMAIL ADDRESS, IN ONE BATCH, WITH INDIVIDUAL ENTRIES ATTACHED.

The poems will be judged by the Wordsworth family and an award ceremony will be held at Rydal Mount, near Ambleside, on Thursday April 27. There will be signed book prizes for the entries highly commended by the judges from the primary and secondary school categories. A trophy will be awarded, along with a cash prize this year of £100, to the overall winner.  The winner’s name will be added to the plaque on the wall at Rydal Mount.

For further information please email Eileen Jones at Eileen@cumbriapr.co.uk

Lib Dem leader backs climate change book

A dramatic new book showing the impact of climate change around the world has won the backing of Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron.

Mr Farron, MP for Westmorland and Lonsdale, has endorsed the book, Images from a Warming Planet which was published recently by Lakes-based photographer Ashley Cooper.

tim-farron-and-ashley-cooper

Mr Farron said: “This book is far more than just a collection of impressive photographs – it documents a massively important and concerning phenomenon that will affect us all. These images vividly show the effect which climate change is having on our planet, and serves as a wake-up call for us all to act before it is too late.”

He joins leading environmental campaigners who have  hailed the book, with its 500 photographs of global devastation, as a call to political action.

Ashley Cooper travelled the globe for 13 years taking photographs in key locations which illustrate the havoc which is being brought upon the natural world. He has amassed the world’s largest collection of pictures documenting climate change on every continent, from the Inuit communities of the Arctic to the coral atoll islands of the Pacific Ocean, showing the damage caused by dependence on fossil fuels:  flooding, glacial erosion, and deforestation.

Leading environmentalist Jonathan Porritt said: “This is a book about change. About the way the climate is already changing, and the way in which it will change even more dramatically in the future. About changes in peoples’ lives as they seek to make sense of weather systems that seem to have slipped those reassuring bounds of normality and predictability. About changes in our understanding of what’s going on around us, in our world views, in our orientation both to our current reality and to the future. And by and large, people really don’t like change.”

Ashley Cooper is one of the finalists in the Cumbria Culture awards for the photographer of the year title, which will be decided on Friday.

Ends