Going greener: what florists can do to help save the planet

Windermere is to host an event to show florists how they can go greener to help save the planet. And one of the country’s leading experts on greenhouse gases will head the discussions.

The day-long workshop at Low Wood Bay Resort and Spa is aimed at companies in the floristry supply chain in Cumbria such as flower wholesalers, event managers, wedding planners, and hotels and other venues.

low wood

Low Wood Bay resort and spa venue

Organised by Eco-Innovation Cumbria, the aim is to explore the business challenges and opportunities for sustainable floristry.

“Hotels and venues are becoming renowned for sourcing local foods, using renewable energy and minimising water consumption, but are the flowers on their tables equally sustainable?” said Glyn Griffiths, Senior Project Officer.

 

“The UK floristry industry is worth £2billion. The Lake District is one of the most popular destinations for hospitality, weddings and corporate events, which places these businesses servicing this sector firmly in the floristry supply chain.”

Sustainable floristry looks at where flowers are sourced, as well as eliminating harmful plastics, foam, cellophanes and other packaging.

Contributors to the event include Mike Berners-Lee, researcher and writer on greenhouse gases, who is professor and fellow of the Institute for Social Futures at Lancaster University and director of Small World Consulting. He will look at the carbon footprint of British and imported cut flowers.

mike berners lee

Mike Berners-Lee

Paula Baxter, co-chair of Flowers from the Farm and owner of Millpond Flower Farm will lead a discussion on British flowers for florists, and there will be case studies and workshop demonstrations.

The Low Wood Bay  team will discuss the environmental practices they implement and how they have achieved Green Tourism Gold award.

The event, on Monday March 11, is free for SME businesses in Cumbria, funded by the ERDF through the Eco-Innovation Cumbria programme, University of Cumbria, and organised by Cumbria Action for Sustainability (CAfS).

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/sustainable-floristry-event-the-reality-and-potential-for-the-floristry-supply-chain-registration-55631761095

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Exercise to improve mental health

A pilot scheme to encourage people to take up exercise starts in Kendal on Sunday (Feb 24).

The mental health mile will start at Abbot Hall social centre on Dowkers Lane at 3pm. It’s organised by Jogging Pals who already operate a Couch to 5k programme, and further training for runners.

This one is aimed at getting people of all abilities, ages and fitness to get together to walk, wheel, jog and talk. A similar event has been held in Lancaster for the past year and the organisers there say that by using exercise, group work and a safe environment, they have helped the more vulnerable in the community to try something new.

Abbot Hall social centre has plenty of parking in the overspill car park, and there are toilets, and refreshment facilities.

“This is aimed at those who don’t do much exercise but might want a healthier life/work balance, and need some support and encouragement,” said Wayne Singleton of Jogging Pals.

“We want to get people out walking and talking primarily. If they want to jog/run then that’s ok, but we want to focus on inclusivity and the positive impact of activity rather than racing.”

Electric vehicles: their role in clean air campaign

Businesses in Cumbria are to get expert advice on how they can improve the environment by using electric vehicles.

A free one-day workshop in Whitehaven, organised by Eco-Innovation Cumbria, will feature demonstrations by some of the region’s leading experts.

The event coincides with the Government’s clean air strategy, and with the Air Quality Forum in London. This offered practical measures to improve air quality in the UK through a collaborative approach of transport, planning and health initiatives.

And in London, the Mayor has announced new initiatives to improve air quality in the capital, including a focus on EVs.

Key note speakers Helen Acott, Fleet Manager for the Energy Savings Trust, and  Regional Development Manager for Renault North West, Mathew Kiziuk, will explain how adopting electric vehicles will help businesses to progress,

And regional car specialists DSG will talk about the reality of using an electric vehicle: the practicality of the technology, emissions, range, lifespan, warranties, running costs, and charging.

van

The workshop, on February 26 at The Beacon in Whitehaven, aims to help firms understand the business case for EVs, and explain about the changing EV infrastructure in Cumbria.

Glyn Griffiths Eco-Innovation Cumbria Project manager said: “Businesses increasingly recognise their responsibility to help the environment. This workshop will explain how they can reduce impact on the environment and reduce CO2, at the same time building business partnerships and collaborations that will collectively help to create the change to a cleaner environment.”

He added: “This workshop will be fast-paced and interactive, encouraging exciting collaborations between organisations as well as innovative solutions. We hope it will appeal to those who have fleets of vehicles, cars and vans, traders and those who use vans for their work.”

Eco-Innovation Cumbria, a project funded by the European Regional Development Fund, offers small to medium sized businesses (SMEs) throughout the county the opportunity to make use of invaluable university resources in order to develop and grow in an innovative and sustainable way.

Said Mr Griffiths: “This project is about creating a positive environmental impact, but it’s also about supporting the business community in Cumbria to grow and thrive.”

Other contributors include Simon Brace, Lakes Electric Delivery Service (LEDS); Phil Davies, Cumbria Action for Sustainability (CAfS); Al Wilson from the Centre for Leadership Performance (CfLP); Daniel Heery, Will Madden and Sue Gilbertson from Charge my Street.

Bookings can be made here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Invitation to learn about electric vehicles

The value of using electric vehicles will be the focus of a free one-day workshop for small and medium businesses in Cumbria.

Organised by Eco-Innovation Cumbria, the event will feature demonstrations by some of the region’s leading experts.

Key note speakers Helen Acott, Fleet Manager for the Energy Savings Trust, and  Regional Development Manager for Renault North West, Mathew Kiziuk, will explain how adopting electric vehicles will help businesses to progress,

And regional car specialists DSG will talk about the reality of using an electric vehicle: the practicality of the technology, emissions, range, lifespan, warranties, running costs, and charging.

The workshop, on February 26 at The Beacon in Whitehaven, aims to help firms understand the business case for EVs, and explain about the changing EV infrastructure in Cumbria.

Glyn Griffiths Eco-Innovation Cumbria Project manager said: “Businesses increasingly recognise their responsibility to help the environment. This workshop will explain how they can reduce impact on the environment and reduce CO2, at the same time building business partnerships and collaborations that will collectively help to create the change to a cleaner environment.”

He added: “This workshop will be fast-paced and interactive, encouraging exciting collaborations between organisations as well as innovative solutions. We hope it will appeal to those who have fleets of vehicles, cars and vans, traders and those who use vans for their work.”

Eco-Innovation Cumbria, a project funded by the European Regional Development Fund, offers small to medium sized businesses (SMEs) throughout the county the opportunity to make use of invaluable university resources in order to develop and grow in an innovative and sustainable way.

Said Mr Griffiths: “This project is about creating a positive environmental impact, but it’s also about supporting the business community in Cumbria to grow and thrive.”

Other contributors include Simon Brace, Lakes Electric Delivery Service (LEDS); Phil Davies, Cumbria Action for Sustainability (CAfS); Al Wilson from the Centre for Leadership Performance (CfLP); Daniel Heery, Will Madden and Sue Gilbertson from Charge my Street

Bookings can be made here

Art tuition in Wordsworth’s garden

 The gardens of William Wordsworth’s home at Rydal Mount will be the setting for a weekend of art classes in the Lake District.

The Easter event is two days of expert tuition from a couple of artists in one of the most beautiful landscaped settings in England.

gardens in may

Beatrice Hasell-McCosh and Tyga Helme will be guiding painters with some experience or none at all in the grounds that inspired the romantic poet.

Beatrice, who works between South London and Cumbria, grew up in the Lake District. Her paintings are based on memory and closely observed figurative studies drawn from life.

Tyga, who studied Fine Art and History of Art at Edinburgh College of Art and the University of Edinburgh, is a draftsman, painter and printmaker, and her work is made exclusively from life.

The art weekend has been organised by Emily Heath who, with husband Matthew, has taken over as curator of Rydal Mount, near Ambleside.

She said: “There is no lovelier place in the world than the Lake District and, for artists, the gardens and grounds here are full of colour and texture, along with the majesty of mature trees.

“The gardens have been landscaped according to plans drawn up by the poet himself. We hope it will prove to be an inspiring location.” She added: “Students will be guided to develop observational skills and explore the different expressive qualities of drawing and painting. Alongside observational and technical skills, deeply personal responses are encouraged through different ways of looking and being in the landscape.”

The art weekend – which doesn’t include accommodation or materials – is on April 21 and 22, and costs £250. Places are limited so early booking is advisable. The organisers can provide a list of local accommodation providers.

Booking here https://www.abbey-art.com/wordsworth

Hosts who will help the Lake District

An Ambleside guest house with strong links to the Lakeland fells has joined the Lake District Foundation visitor giving scheme.

Guests planning to stay at Haven Guest House will now have an opportunity to make a donation when they stay at the property, and the owners will also donate £1 for every direct booking.

allie an chris

Allie and Chris Hodgson

The guest house is run by Allie and Chris Hodgson who are closely connected with an event that helps the local community across the valley in the Patterdale area. They are members of the team that organises the annual Hodgson Brothers Mountain Relay race which in turn helps raise funds for the people and the places around the event.

“Over the years we have built a close relationship with many people in the local Patterdale community; we rely on the goodwill and generosity of the landowners and residents in the valley so try to put something back into the area on an annual basis,” said Chris. The event is named in the memory of two of his sporting brothers who died tragically young.

Leg1 start

Runners in the Hodgson Brothers relay in the Lake District

“So we are delighted to help the Lake District Foundation which funds conservation, environmental and cultural heritage projects in whole of the Lakes. As well as raising funds we want to raise awareness of the Foundation and will be publicising their work in our guest house”

Recent Foundation projects have included a grant of £4,500 to the Cumbria Local Nature Partnership, enabling them to lead the development of a strategic approach for managing the biodiversity of the National Park; and a grant of over £2,600 to the John Muir Trust, which last year took over responsibility for the management of a large part of Helvellyn. The money will fund a new project aiming to increase the populations of threatened arctic-alpine species found on the high crags of the Helvellyn range.

“The relay organisers made a donation this year to the John Muir Helvellyn project, and this is something very dear to our hearts,” said Chris.

In 2018 the relay organisers also supported Glenridding Village Hall; Patterdale School & Nursery who raise nearly £2000 by serving refreshments at the event; and the King George V Playing Fields in Patterdale which is race HQ and who are currently raising funds for a new pavilion.

 

The Lake District Foundation inspires people to care for and donate to projects that care for the spectacular wildlife, landscapes and cultural heritage of the Lake District and Cumbria.  The LDF supports the delivery of the shared aims of the Lake District National Park Partnership as the main fundraising and grant making partner. This is achieved through innovative and successful fundraising campaigns locally, nationally and internationally. The Lake District Foundation encourages partners to work together to ensure a coordinated approach to fundraising and income generation. For more information visit www.lakedistrictfoundation.org.

 

New Kendal show by Cumbrian artist

New paintings by Cumbrian artist Linda Ryle are on show at Kendal’s Abbot Hall gallery.

The ten recent oil paintings fill the wall reserved for contemporary art in the gallery’s shop and all are all for sale. The display will run until the end of January.

Linda Ryle in her studio.

Linda made her name in the 1970s making belts for celebrities. She went on to develop an extensive and unusual career including craft work and different periods of painting. A major retrospective, Time Regained, was staged at Grasmere’s Heaton Cooper Studio two years ago.

Born in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Linda trained at Goldsmiths’ School of Art, London in the 1960s, and now lives in Cockermouth. She is married to the painter Julian Cooper.

She designed and produced leather belts for the shop Ace on Chelsea’s Kings Road (and later at Covent Garden market) whose clientele included singers, actors and celebrities such as Elton John, Lulu, Bianca Jagger and Brit Ekland.

As a painter her work included farm animals and cats, some of which were published as cards, but by the mid-1980s she had diversified.  There was, for example, a series of small canvasses based on dreams, after she had become immersed in the ideas of Carl Jung, the analytical psychologist.

Linda’s first solo show was in 2004 at the Percy House Gallery in Cockermouth. The paintings of trees, river and beck had begun in the late 1990s, inspired by the sound and movement of wind through leaves and branches, sunlight on pebbles, the drag and flow of reeds.

The new display in Kendal, interior objects, are oils painted on linen.

linda ryle paintings at Abbot Hall